Monthly Archives: January, 2012

Top 30 Videos of 2011: The Top 10!

You guys! This is it!

I’ve teased you for long enough, dragged this fucker out as far as I could possibly stretch it. Now, at the end of the month, you all finally get to experience the ten best music videos released before December 31st, 2011 and after December 31st, 2010. Here, boys and girls, are Yes, We’ve Got a Video!‘s top ten for 2011!

10. Bon Iver – Holocene
Directed by Nabil Elderkin

I’ve often said that the best music videos can create a perfect atmosphere for the song that is its soundtrack. Many fine examples of this are scattered throughout the top 30, but I feel like very few came as close to this  than the effort for Bon Iver‘s second single from the strangely-titled Bon Iver, Bon Iver. Shot in the breathtakingly gorgeous surrounds of Iceland, a little boy wordlessly explores parts of this glorious country. It almost feels as though time is slowing down when you watch this video, taking in the excitement and the awe and the utter wonder that comes with this little boy. It’s a video in which you can’t just watch while you’re doing other things, checking emails or poking the person you like on Facebook or whatever else have you. It’s a full involvement – and this alone should serve as proof that the art of the music video is not dead. Videos like Holocene matter – and if you didn’t know that already, perhaps now is the time.

Read my original blog on Holocene here.

9. SebastiAn – Embody
Directed by So Me

Here’s a left-field smash from a couple of eccentric Parisians – director So Me and electronica producer SebastiAn. The latter is certainly not one to shy away from confronting and confusing imagery – you only have to take one glimpse at his album cover for Total, in which he is making out with himself, to know that. Teaming up with So Me seemed to be the perfect match, then, as the robotic electronica track is turned into the soundtrack for a peculiar tale of dancing, imagination and being lost in the music. The entire time, the viewer is left to wonder how much of this is “real” – or, at least, as “real” as something can get in a music video context. The ending won’t help, either way. It’s all still up in the air. What does this young man represent as he dances throughout the town and in a variety of situations? I say it all depends on how much you invest in Embody, and how you respond on an emotional basis to this seemingly surreal montage. There are dozens of end results, subsequently, and that’s part of what makes this such an excellent video. Nothing quite like it came out in 2011.

8. Brendan Maclean – Cold and Happy
Directed by Peter Ireland

Top ten twice in a row? You’d better believe that Brendan Maclean and Brisbane director Peter Ireland are onto something. After the wild circus-tent madness that was Practically Wasted, the opening number from B-Mac’s White Canvas EP, the second single was a more subdued affair – initially, at least. Maclean has gone from a manic split personality of the slave and the master to a humble bingo night runner. It all seems sweet, up until a cheeky elder citizen decides to do something a little different with dessert than just eat it. You’ve probably guessed where this is headed, but it’s not the predictability that is Cold and Happy‘s selling point. It’s the utter charm of the thing – the liveliness, the sweet nature, the subtle streak of naughtiness. Cold and Happy is a joy to watch, every single time.

Read my original blog on Cold and Happy here.

7. Tyler, the Creator – Yonkers
Directed by Wolf Haley

Kanye West had no bones about straight-up calling this “the video of the year.” Not too outlandish – except, let’s remind you, that he said this back in February, when the video was released. Nearly a year on and he’s not too far from the truth. How could Yeezy – as well as Tyler, the Creator himself – have gotten it so right? After all, it’s not like Yonkers sets out to be anything inventive or fun – it’s quite intentionally an off-putting and ugly video. Shot in ghoulish black and white, Tyler raps on a chair before eating a cockroach, vomits and then hangs himself. It’s vile, it’s indulgent, it’s creepy, it’s… well, it’s utterly watchable and completely fascinating. For all of its efforts to turn Tyler into a vile creature, it becomes increasingly difficult to turn away from the video – no matter how much the envelope is pushed. Having Tyler himself as the central character with literally no-one else apart from the aforementioned cockroach in the video also engages you as a viewer in a very confronting one-on-one perspective. To me, Tyler was easily the water cooler act of the year – from this to the controversy surrounding the Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All crew, it seems that nearly every music fan was discussing this very peculiar young man. I think the greatest thing that can be said, though, is this: whether you were a fan of the group or whether they sent you into a hyperbolic “think of the children” frenzy not seen this side of when Eminem was relevant, Tyler, the Creator made music fans feel something either way. Bold and brazen, Yonkers was definitely a clip that needed to be seen to be believed.

6. Katy Perry – Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.)
Directed by Marc Klasfield

I feel like there’s been a major renaissance in the top 40 pop video in the past few years. You could certainly link this to acts like Lady Gaga, who took out the top spot in last year’s countdown with flying colours thanks to the game-changing Telephone. Overall, though, I think it’s just a case of a lot of pop acts realising that there is more to a clip than just to move numbers, and for gratuitous bitches and bling. It’s an art form, and one that can be celebrated no matter what walk of musical life you come from. Sadly, aside from outstanding efforts from both Ke$ha and Britney Spears, no pop act quite managed to cause quite the frenzy that Gaga did last year – not even Gaga herself, with a slew of mostly quite disappointing videos from her batch of Born The Way singles. May it be put on the record, however, that the divine miss Katy Perry came the absolute closest.

A singles and video machine, Perry secured two positions in last year’s countdown for Firework and California Gurls, but in 2011 she managed to make a video that was greater than all of her previous ones combined. Put quite simply, Last Friday Night was the pop video event of the year. Amazing, then, that this happened without Perry herself even appearing in the video. Not even once! There was a young lady who looked remarkably like her, though – thirteen-year-old Kathy Beth Terry, a daggy teen who simply got caught up in a whole heap of craziness one Friday night. Whilst trying to study, she became distracted by the party across the road, hosted by the adorable Rebecca Black; furiously heading over there to sort out the mess. The rest, as they say, is history: Hanson rock up, Kenny G plays a sax solo, Artie from Glee falls in love and kicks arse… all in all, it’s one hell of a party.

This easily set itself up as one of the most fun-loving and delightful viewing experiences of the year. The whole team really went all-out here, delivering a gorgeously glossy pop video that truly did take the meaning of the song to another level. The chunks of pop-culture-reference gold also makes this a must-see video for all pop trainspotters out there. See if you recognise who the parents of Kathy are near the end of the clip, for instance! There’s just so much to enjoy about this. Don’t act like you’re too cool for it.

Read my original blog on Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.) here.

5. Manchester Orchestra – Simple Math
Directed by Daniels

Pretty much anyone who’s heard more than a fleeting moment of Manchester Orchestra‘s music is sure to confirm that this isn’t an act that does things half-heartedly. They are an all-in, often quite heart-wrenching experience – and that’s just from listening to them. It gets all the more powerful when given an audio-visual aspect, as proven with this stunning visual companion to the title track of the band’s excellent third album. In this clip – the second appearance in the countdown from the unstoppable Daniels direction team – a series of road-related experiences are tied together in a seemingly jumbled memory. It takes awhile for the whole thing to sink in and be properly understood, but holy mother of God when this thing hits…it hits hard. Artistic beauty, and something that everyone involved should be so incredibly proud of.

Read my original blog on Simple Math here.

4. World Order – Machine Civilisation
Directed by Genki Sudo

“I am around the odd section of YouTube once again,” exclaims a user of the site, commenting on a music video. It’s a common expression amongst users, often going down “holes” (in which one clicks on a related video, then the a related video of that related video, and so on), often coming across very bizarre and crudely-made videos the further they go down said “hole.” Were such a hole to lead them to something as original, creative and downright awe-inspiring as Machine Civilization, the stunning music video from Japanese collective World Order, one would have to think that the destination was more than worth the journey.

What can be said about a video that is bound to leave you speechless? A team of seven men – including Genki Sudo, the brains behind World Order and the director of the video – begin their journey at what appears to be Tokyo airport.  From there, they defy both time and physics with some out of the ordinary choreography, moving from seaside wharfs to industrial lots with their shapeshifting dances. I’m not sure if dancing is the right word for it, but whatever they are doing… man, some of it just defies belief. If this video doesn’t make you stop dead in your tracks at least half a dozen times, you’re not watching the right video.

It’s worth mentioning all of it was done in real-time, too – all that shit that looks as though it’s totally warped and slowed down is a genius optical illusion. No kidding. Machine Civilisation is a shining example of exactly what can happen when one ends up on the odd section of YouTube. A song brought to life in a way that no-one could have seen coming.

3. Kimbra – Cameo Lover
Directed by Guy Franklin

To me, the most powerful command issued in pop music all year was probably the most simple – “Open up your heart!” as sung by the stunning Kimbra Johnson. Her noble quest to get the person on the receiving end of said command is brought to life through this clip, making for some absolutely wondrous results. It’s been a fantastic year for Kimbra, dropping her debut album in Vows and selling out shows all around the place. For all those achievements, though, I can’t help but feel nothing quite compared to the outright endorphin-releasing delights of the Cameo Lover video. Can you blame me? Have you seen this thing? With its technicolour landscape, delightful costumed characters… oh, and that ENDING! Holy shit, I don’t think any video has quite responded to the glory of a key change in such gorgeous fashion. I have watched this video possibly more than I have watched any other clip this year, and it still makes me as giddy as anything when I watch it. It’s just an absolute treat for the senses. Exactly why the hell HAVEN’T you opened up your heart yet?

Read my original blog on Cameo Lover here.

2. Children Collide – Loveless
Directed by David Michôd

Sometimes, sacrifices are made in order to create a great music video. It could be doing some crazy shit with fire, some mad stunts, even learning to jump rope (as the previously-listed Bluejuice had to do). In this instance, Children Collide‘s frontman Johnny Mackay sacrificed his most defining visual aspect – his long flowing locks – in order to create this dark, confronting and shatteringly powerful video. Seemingly not a big sacrifice – surely rockstars get a slab of “get a haircut” jibes all the time. Not only is this Children Collide’s best video, it’s amongst one of the greatest works of art this country has produced in the last few years. Hyperbole? Sure, if you want to play it like that. But watch this video from start to finish, without any distractions, and just see if it doesn’t feel like the visual equivalent of being punched in the guts.

There is no escaping Mackay’s desperation as he sits close to the camera, spitting out the lyrics with the kind of cathartic vitriol you can only imagine was in his mind when he wrote them to begin with. He begins with a headful of hair and a face full of clown make-up, both of which are forcefully taken from him as he sits there and gets what is coming to him. As the lyrics describe the demise of a relationship, Mackay himself lets go of everything resembling him – including playing the clown, explaining the Joker-esque makeup. An obvious metaphor, maybe, but don’t like it didn’t paint you curious the second his face appeared on-screen.

While there are a lot of very broad and powerful expressions here, I found the most impact in the subtler moments of the clip. Director David Michôd, responsible for the landmark Animal Kingdom, holds down Mackay in one scene with a firm headlock – a small but startling part of proceedings. At the very end, Mackay also runs his hands through his newly shaved head and freshly clean face… only for us as the viewers to find that he has been handcuffed this entire time. It slays me every time – this tiny little twist, one that most might not even pick up the first time around; representing the trapped, helpless feelings conveyed throughout both the song and the video. And it’s moments like these that make this video what it is. Loveless is a deeply personal and often quite scathing vision – essential viewing, but it may cut much too close to the bone for some. In many ways, that’s the point.

Read my original blog on Loveless here.

1. Gotye featuring Kimbra – Somebody That I Used to Know
Directed by Natasha Pincus

Yep. You probably guessed it. Maybe I’m that obvious, or maybe you’ve found this whole list to be predictable. Or – maybe, just maybe, there was absolutely no contest as to who would take out the top spot when it came to the year’s greatest videos. Think about it for just a second. Has any video from this year generated this kind of response? This kind of movement? This kind of emotional reaction? This many bloody reposts on Facebook? This was the year that Wally de Backer – best known to you and I as Gotye – became perhaps the most unlikely popstar Australia has produced this century, aside from maybe Luke Steele. Eyes Wide Open got the ball rolling – it fell just shy of our top 10 last year, coming in at number 11 – but the song and video phenomenon of Somebody is where the tide truly changed.

With body paint, stop-motion photography and no-one except Gotye and miss Kimbra Johnson (back so soon, ma’am?) in the video, this was a shining example of a living, breathing work of art. It takes you by surprise the first time. “Were they really butt-naked? That’s how much of their body covered in paint? How are they both that good-looking?” Maybe that last one’s just me. The second time, you notice the littler things – the apathy in Wally’s eyes in the first verse, the passion of that first chorus and the way he just winces as though a band-aid has been torn off his person after Kimbra sings to him.

As for Kimbra, it’s in the way she shrugs her shoulders and glides to his side. It’s that look of utter desperation and remorse when she howls into Wally’s face, while he never makes eye contact. By the time he does, it’s too late. They stare at one another from a distance – longingly, regrettibly – before it suddenly cuts to black. It should be noticed that this is when they are simply observed. It’s in the views that come after this – and, for most, there were more than plenty – in which the smaller pieces of the puzzle truly began to be felt. For many, it hit like a truck – whether you had felt the pain of either character, whether you were in the right or in the wrong, this video resonated. It smacked you in the face. It really made you think. With all of that in mind, how many videos can you honestly say has done that to you in this, or any other year?

Somebody That I Used to Know is a unique, artistic experience. A video that will certainly grow iconic in its status. A video that notched up the bar for Australian music videos and music video makers (kudos, Natasha Pincus) and still managed to clear it.

Video of the year? Of course – it’s the obvious choice, after all.

Read my original blog on Somebody That I Used to Know here.

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That’s it! Thanks so much to all of the artists, all of the directors, all of the producers, cinematographers… EVERYONE who worked on these videos! Your efforts are remarkable, and if I could have given you anything more than my highest of accolades than I would in a heartbeat!

Yes, We’ve Got a Video! resumes normal programming this time next week. Until, then, make sure you’re caught up with the following:

Don’t forget to leave a comment below; or, of course, drop me an email!

See you guys soon!

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Top 30 Videos of 2011: 15 – 11

Sooooooo close to the top 10. I’m probably pissing a LOT of you off now. Apologies if that’s the case – just spreading this out as smoothly as I can. Anyway, we’ve got five more videos before we crack the top spots – you in?

15. Coldplay – Every Teardrop is a Waterfall
Directed by Mat Whitecross

Love them or hate them, Coldplay have been responsible for a stack of definitive videos over their time as a band. Chris Martin running across the beach in Yellow, Chris Martin doing everything in reverse in The Scientist, the specatcular athleticism of the late Barbara Moseley as the band played on in The Hardest Part, the stop-motion superhero glory of Strawberry Swing… I could go on. They continued this with the breath-taking clip for Mylo Xyloto‘s lead single, which mixed street-art and Strawberry Swing-esque stop-motion with a myriad of sparkling bright colour. It might be trivial and childish of me to adore this video purely for the pretty colours and whatnot, but I love this video purely on the basis of how it looks and how it makes me feel. Can you really ask for much more?

Read my original blog on Every Teardrop is a Waterfall here.

14. Battles feat. Matias Aguayo – Ice Cream
Directed by Canada

At this point of proceedings, you should probably know that I have absolutely no fucking idea what this video is about. I could give you some long-winded drivel about how it’s a metaphor for something or other and how the appearance of X next to Y clearly means Z… but I just can’t. By no means am I an anti-intellectual, and you, dear reader, are free to read into this video from Battles (their second in the countdown, yay!) as much as you want. All I can tell you is that I have no idea what all of this means. I just happen to think that it’s a really fucking cool video: a blur of warped imagery, absurdism, abstract art, obscure references to other artists and New York-style pretension. It’s a beautiful thing. It’s something out of a million nothings. It’s nonsensical sense. It’s Ice Cream.

Read my original blog on Ice Cream here.

13. Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears – Mustang Ranch
Directed by Bill Stevenson

Sometimes, a story is so utterly wild and ridiculous, that it just needs to be told. Such was the case with big-band rockers Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears, who decided to recall a particularly wild night on a road trip from Salt Lake City to San Francisco on their latest album, Scandalous. Of course, they couldn’t re-enact the whole thing when it came to making the video, so bassist and video director Bill Stevenson decided that the story still needed to be told – and lo, it would be a hilarious animated romp like none other in 2011. Sure, there may be some embellished truths within this clip – was there really a rabbit fucking a chicken in the front yard? – but these sort of things assist in making the clip all the more entertaining. The crude animation adds to the charm of the whole thing, and assists in gaining repeated views – every time, cracking a smile without fail. More, please!

12. Foo Fighers – White Limo
Directed by Dave Grohl

Let’s not bullshit about here: If there’s one thing the Foo Fighters have know, currently know and always will know, it’s music videos. Three official clips were made for tracks from the band’s return-to-form, Wasting Light, including a roughly-shot Rope and a Revenge of the Nerds-esque adventure for Walk. There was no question as to what the pick of the lot was, however, as the band delivered their best video since the Jack Black-starring and highly NSFW Low, back in the early 2000s. What more could you ask for in a video? There was Lemmy pretending to drive a limo! There was Dave Grohl in a COPS jumper! There was Nate Mendel on rollerblades! The whole thing looks like it was shot on an 80s camcorder! This is utterly daggy perfection, proof that even arguably the biggest contemporary rock band in the world still couldn’t bring themselves to be taken fully seriously. The triumphant return of Pat Smear, making his first video appearance since Everlong, was a nice touch, too. Footastic.

Read my original blog on White Limo here.

11. Totally Unicorn – Daddy’s Stabby Surprise
Directed by Mikey Hamer

Here it is, folks. The most wildly inappropriate video of the year. Not the best, not the smartest, not the most thought-provoking…not that it sets out to be any of those things. No, friends, this is just the most NSFW of all the NSFW videos released in 2011. Full-frontal nudity – non-stop, I might add. Lots of alcohol. Lots of dudes with their clothes off. Some weird, sexual shit going down. Did I mention the non-stop nudity? And it’s all within less than 2.5 minutes. Now, that has GOTTA count for something, hasn’t it? It’s been a really killer year for the Totes guys, and it’s been a fucking wild ride watching them throughout 2011. Of all they achieved this year, however, probably none of it quite matches up to this pure dick-wiggling insanity. And that’s not downplaying everything else they’ve done – it’s up-playing this killer video.

Read my original blog on Daddy’s Stabby Surprise here.

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Home stretch, dudes! Let’s wrap this fucker up… on the 30th. Sorry, I hate to be a dick but rulez is rulez! In the meantime, the normal business:

That’ll do for now. The top ten drops next Monday!

Top 30 Videos of 2011: 20 – 16

Ten down, twenty to go. There have been some killer inclusions so far, and the following five is no exception. You want teddy bears? Ninjas? Car chases? Michael Bolton? We got ALL of that shit, right here! Let’s go!

20. Rhys Muldoon – I’m Not Singing
Directed by Natalie van den Dungen

A double-spud for one of Australia’s finest actors and one of Australia’s finest video directors. Both Rhys and Natalie were involved with Darren Hanlon‘s wonderful Butterfly Bones video, and they make their return here to focus on the title track for Rhys’ debut kids’ album. It’s an adorable mini-adventure, following the rockstar lifestyle of a keyboard-and-drums duo making their way to yet another rocking gig – except their roadie keeps nagging them about listening to his album. “I’ve been driving you four years,” he moans. “I don’t know how many times I have to ask!” We should probably mention at this time that the duo are teddy bears, and the roadie is Rhys Muldoon himself. The puppetry is simple, the animated background is sweet and the dancing kids just make this video. Few Aussie clips were this fun in 2011 – and you can only imagine that this would have been the most fun to be a part of. Ahh, Rhys – is there anything you can’t do?

19. Bluejuice – Act Yr Age
Directed by Sam Bennetts

It all started with throwing on robes and turning into a cult that believed that the gaps in peanut butter jars were actually negative space, way back when in 2007. Ever since, Bluejuice have been responsible for some of the most insane dedication to awesome music videos this side of OKGO. So how do they do it this time? Amazingly, they haven’t done something completely insane – let’s not forget that their past videos have including the band jumping out of an aeroplane and learning how to jump rope from scratch. Rather, this just involves the pure gutsiness of Mr. Jake Stone. If you haven’t seen it, I’m not going to spoil it. All you need to know is this: You know that bar that Bluejuice keep setting for themselves and their videos? They keep fucking clearing it.

Read my original blog on Act Yr Age here.

18. The Lonely Island feat. Michael Bolton – Jack Sparrow
Directed by Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer

Although Turtleneck and Chain, the sophomore album for Saturday Night Live kids The Lonely Island, didn’t quite hit the mark in the way that their killer 2009 Incredibad did, it almost went without saying that they were going to make one of the best videos of the year. The trio are easily one of the few things that keep people coming back to SNL, and this side-splitter shows exactly why that’s the case. Everything is lampooned, nothing is sacred, and they have no problem in coaxing major celebrities in poking fun at their area of music, either. T-Pain was the generic AutoTune hook, Akon got the squirrel-y hook and now the Godfather of mullety cheese Michael Bolton gets a taste. You can clearly tell he’s loving every second of it, too, as he switches from pirate costumes to his best Al Pacino impression. Killer timing, played just right – The Lonely Island are more than just frat-boy fun. They’re something for everyone.

Read my original blog on Jack Sparrow here.

17. Art vs. Science – Higher
Directed by Dave Budge

What more can we say about Art vs. Science? We bloody love them. They’ve been featured four times, they charted in last year’s countdown with their bombastic Magic Fountain video and they make a triumphant return once again to top off an absolutely sensational year. They dropped The Experiment, their debut album, toured nationally and internationally, rocked the ARIAs with one of the best performances in years and released a selection of great videos. This particular adventure, however, was unquestionably the pick of the lot. It’s easy to imagine the AvS guys as cool dudes, but what happens when they become secret agents that jump out of planes and battle aliens? Whadaya think, dummy? A whole stack of crazy shit goes down – and it’s nothing short of riotously entertaining throughout. Congrats, gents.

Read my original blog on Higher here.

16. Britney Spears – I Wanna Go
Directed by Chris Marrs Piliero

Just throwing this out there, but what a great year for pop videos. Some mild wankery aside, there were some truly sensational clips ruling the charts throughout the year. It’s great to see some major acts doing some tongue-in-cheek stuff, not worrying about maintaining a “rep” or “cred” or whatever – and major kudos has to go to Chris Marrs Piliero, making his second appearance in the countdown after his wonderful unicorn bloodbath with Ke$ha. On this, her thirty-sixth(!) music video, Britney gets delightfully bitchy in a paparazzi stand-off, referencing everything from The Terminator to her very own Crossroads 2. It’s all very wink-wink-nudge-nudge, and you can clearly tell that Britters and CMP would not have had it any other way. Even if you’re not a Britney fan, give the lady some credit for shaking shit up just a little!

Read my original blog on I Wanna Go here.

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A very fun segment of the countdown today. Did you enjoy these clips too? Let us know what you think – drop a comment below or shoot an email across to gotavideo@gmail.com. You can catch up on part one HERE and part two HERE. The second half of the countdown begins next week! See you then!

Top 30 Videos of 2011: 25 – 21

Part two! A very tasty five clips last week, but they’re about to get even better and better! From escalators to James van der Beek and back, let’s edge just a little bit closer to the top 20…

25. Battles feat. Gary Numan – My Machines
Directed by Daniels

It was great to have the brilliant Battles make their return in 2011, proving they still had what it took despite losing vocalist/frontman Tyondai Braxton. Gloss Drop kicked all kinds of arse, and it got even better when they made their return to videos. Bringing along Gary Numan for the ride, this very simple but incredibly effective clip revolves around a single location – an escalator at a shopping mall. Not too enthralling on paper, until a father desperately attempts to grab a dropped present for his son, tumbling down the “up” side of the escalator. A gripping, exciting video that is great for both simply enjoying and for complete and utter over-analysis, which I thankfully haven’t done here but am prone to do from time to time.

Read my original blog on My Machines here.

24. Darren Hanlon – Butterfly Bones
Directed by Natalie van den Dungen

I knew I was going to love this video as soon as I heard about it. One of my favourite directors, Natalie van den Dungen, at the helm (also responsible for Darren’s great All These Things video from 2010, amongst others); as well as two of my favourite Australian actors, Jessica Tovey (Home and Away, Paper Giants) and Rhys Muldoon (The Secret Life of Us, Play School) making appearances. Sure enough, I adored this clip from the very second I saw it: Darren Hanlon is his usual adorable self, the cinematography and locations are utterly gorgeous and even cranky old writer Bob Ellis makes a great cameo with his sole line: “You bastards!” I maintain that anyone who isn’t a fan of Darren’s – especially after seeing his videos – needs a soul.

Read my original post on Butterfly Bones here.

23. Death Cab for Cutie – Home is a Fire
Directed by Shepard Fairey and Nicholas Harmer

Some delightfully clever stuff here from the Death Cab guys, who made one of the year’s most underrated records (in my humble opinion, of course) in Codes and Keys. The video is a collaboration between the band’s bassist, Nick Harmer (also responsible for The Decemberists‘ excellent Sixteen Military Wives video) and prominent stencil artist Shepard Fairey. Fairey is best known for his Andre the Giant Has a Posse and Barack Obama: Hope art, stickers and posters. Stencils featuring the lyrics of Home is a Fire were created and put up and around various city locations, with some wonderful shots of their creation as well as shots of the stencils in relation to their part of the song. It’s an ambitious proejct, but one that has worked significantly in the band’s favour – truly one of their most special videos to date.

Read my original blog on Home is a Fire here.

22. Ke$ha – Blow
Directed by Chris Marrs Piliero

OK, we should probably get the facts out of the way first. I’m not a Ke$ha fan, I don’t enjoy the majority of her music and she often has a tendency of getting on my nerves. That said, I am more than willing to put literally all of my premonitions and grudges aside if it means I get to enjoy this video. I love this fucking video. As far as mainstream top-40 pop clips went this year, few topped Ke$ha’s efforts alongside former Dawson’s Creek heart-throb James van der Beek – or, “James van der Douche,” if you believe Ke$ha’s insults. The two are at some sort of bizarre party where they are essentially the only humans – the rest are unicorns in suits. No shit. The humour is much more knowing and tacky than her previous videos, and the whole thing looks fantastic without the obvious commercial sheen. I’m not going to become her #1 fan overnight, but I’ll be damned if Ke-dollar-sign-ha hasn’t won this round.

21. TV on the Radio – Will Do
Directed by Dugan O’Neil

Been a lot of ups and downs for TV on the Radio this year, but I admire them so much for overcoming the loss of their friend and long-serving bass player Gerard Smith, whom appears briefly in the video, and continue on as a four-piece in support of the excellent Nine Types of Light. It was sudden and devastating, but they’ve risen from the ashes and ultimately triumphed, particularly with some amazing shows in November here in Oz. I’ve always loved the imagination and imagery of TVotR’s videos, but I’ve found this one to be easily the most affecting out of everything they’ve done. It’s bold and very emotional, depicting how blurred the lines can become between fantasy and reality – and, subsequently, just how frustrating that can be for some. It’s heartbreaking, but beautiful to watch – not to mention how beautiful it is to look at, especially in HD. A defintive and powerful clip that stands alone as a work of art as it does an accompaniment.

Read my original blog on Will Do here.

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10 down, 20 to go. The suspense, naturally, is killing you.

Catch up on part one here.

Send me your best clips of the year here.

All sorted? Jolly good. This time next week, then.

Top 30 Videos of 2011: 30 – 26

Happy New Year, everyone! Hope you’ve been having an amazing time with the new year, and that you had a fun and safe Christmas. I’ve been at Peats Ridge once again, having a blast. Have just had an amazing week of gigs, too. But no rest for the wicked – this time next week, I’ll be jetting to Melbourne for a week for my first-ever visit there! How exciting! Anyway, prior to our official full-time return in February, here are the best 30 videos from last year. There’s some fun, some sadness, some beauty and a few unexpected gems. Let’s dig in!

With apologies to: Beastie Boys, Ball Park Music, Wavves, Beyonce, R.E.M., Jebediah, Seeker Lover Keeper, Fishing, Alpine, Snakadaktal, The Black Keys, Unkle and Is Tropical.

30. The National – Conversation 16
Directed by Scott Jacobson

Deep down, don’t we all want to live in a world where Kristen freaking Schaal gets to be President? No? Just me? Anyway, this was a peculiar choice for the final single to be lifted from 2010’s excellent High Violet record – but it resulted in possibly the best video the band have ever done. An unrequited love story between Schaal and Mad Men‘s John Slattery, this is a fantastically done video which plays out more like a silent movie – the expressions on the faces, as well as the music itself, explains it all. Truly one of the best bands in the world, giving us a great way to kick off the countdown.

Read my original blog on Conversation 16 here.

29. Fireworks – Arrows
Directed by Thom Glunt

Gospel, the outstanding second record from Detroit pop-punkers Fireworks, was easily one of my favourite albums of the year. Not to sound discriminatory or anything like that, but I certainly wasn’t expecting the band to add a video of the year contender with the clip for the album’s lead track and lead single. Have I simply come to suspect that all pop-punk bands do is tour footage montages? Anyway, the band themselves are nowhere to be seen in this video – instead, they leave the dirty work to a particularly sadistic arch-villian. He’s hell-bent on eliminating a family, one by one – but not in the way you’d expect, and certainly not with the motive you would expect, either. Oh, the suspense!

Read my original blog on Arrows here.

28. Snow Patrol – Called Out in the Dark
Directed by Brett Simon

If you take a cliche and twist it slightly, what does it become? Original, or just a counter-cliche? Whatever the case, consider this old chestnut: a music video inside a music video. You’ve seen it done, from Jack Johnson to Fall Out Boy and back again. It can still be clever, but you’ll be damned if it’s not cliche. Consider this curveball, though: What if you, the creator of the music, were not allowed to star in your own video (within a video)? This is what happens to Gary Lightbody, as he attempts to weave his way back onto camera and win over the director (played by Boston Legal‘s Tara Summers). For a band that have often been dismissed as too serious or glum, this is certainly a surprising turn – and one you can be grateful they have taken, if it leads to more great videos like this. As far as counter-cliches go, this isn’t too shabby at all.

Read my original blog on Called Out in the Dark here.

27. They Might Be Giants – Can’t Keep Johnny Down (video contest winner version)
Directed by Mohit Jaswal

This one might cause a little bit of controversy. As much as I liked the concept of the official Can’t Keep Johnny Down video, which features Rip Torn doing what he does best (kick arse), I couldn’t help but be drawn to the charms of the video contest the band held to make a video for the song. Some great entries came forth, but I’m of the firm belief that not only was the winner the most deserving, but also the best video for Johnny that has been made. It begins with underpants on the ground in the forest. It ends with a frustrated man in the office. In-between, there are pools, coupons, motorbikes and a variety of other slow-motion escapades. How does it all come together? Fucking beautifully. So watch for yourself.

26. Mamas Gun – Reconnection
Directed by James Stoneley

A delightfully unexpected nugget of gold came in the form of this little winner from up-and-coming London groovers Mamas Gun, who I had never heard of before getting recommended this clip through the blog’s email address. It only took one viewing for me to completely fall for its charm, and I can only assume it will do the very same for you. The brightly-coloured adventure takes its queues mostly from Alice in Wonderland, but it’s by no means a direct rip. All things considered, it’s quite inventive – I love the multiple camera effects and the costume changes, as well as the fact that every band member plays something different. A joy to watch every single time.

Read my original blog on Reconnection here.

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That’s it, gang! Thanks so much for reading, and I’ll see you for part 2 of 5 this time next week! In the meantime, feel free to submit your own favourites or comments on these in the comment section below, or over at gotavideo@gmail.com. Sound good? Great!

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